Hip Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy, also referred to as keyhole or minimally invasive surgery, is a procedure in which an arthroscope is inserted into a joint to check for any damage and repair it simultaneously.

An arthroscope is a small, fiber-optic instrument consisting of a lens, light source, and video camera.

Reasons for Hip Arthroscopy

  • Removal of torn cartilage or bone chips that cause hip pain and immobility
  • Repair a torn labrum (fibrous cartilage ring that lines the acetabular socket)
  • Removal of bone spurs or extra bone growths caused by arthritis or an injury.
  • Removal of part of the inflamed synovium (lining of the joint) in patients with inflammatory arthritis (partial synovectomy)
  • Repair of fractures or torn ligaments caused by trauma
  • Evaluation and diagnosis of conditions with unexplained pain, swelling, or stiffness in the hip that does not respond to conservative treatment

Advantages of Hip Arthroscopy

The advantages of hip arthroscopy over the traditional open hip surgery include:

  • Smaller incisions
  • Minimal trauma to surrounding ligaments, muscles, and tissues
  • Less pain
  • Faster recovery
  • Lower infection rate
  • Less scarring
  • Early mobilization
  • Shorter hospital stay

Postoperative Care for Hip Arthroscopy

Your doctor may advise you to take certain precautions to promote faster recovery and prevent further complications. These include:

  • Taking pain medications as prescribed
  • Use of crutches to prevent or limit bearing weight on the operated hip
  • Physical therapy exercises should be performed to restore normal hip function and improve flexibility and strength
  • Eating a healthy diet and avoiding smoking will help in faster healing and recovery
  • Avoid activity which involves lifting heavy things or strenuous exercises for the first few weeks after surgery